Documents: 54, displayed: 1 - 20

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Aarau, Staatsarchiv Aargau, AA/4533
Parchment · 56 ff. · 39 x 28 cm · Southwestern Germany · 1441
Annal of Hermetschwil Convent

Calendar listing annual donations to the Convent of Benedictine Nuns of Hermetschwil ( Aargau), dated 1441 and found at the district office of Bremgarten in 1884. It also contains several notes in chronicle format regarding the founding of the convent, the rebuilding of the church in 1603-1605 and 1624/1625, as well as offerings for masses following divine apparitions in 1636-1692. Inserted in the front is a letter from July 12, 1693. (hug)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 258
Parchment · 192 ff. · 27.5 x 19.5-20 cm · France · second half of the 9th century
Glossae biblicae; Glossaria latina, lat.

This manuscript, which was probably produced in Fleury, consists of two independent parts. The first part (f. 1-47) comprises three commentaries on the Old and the New Testament; the second part (f. 48-192) consists of a total of 14 glossaries containing a total of about 25,000 lemmas. A particularity of this manuscript is that it shows different stages in the development of glossaries side by side. The first part represents an earlier stage with definitions of words in the order of the source text, also containing glosses in Old English and Old High German. In the second part the glossaries are already more developed with entries on individual authors or certain topics, ordered alphabetically by keywords. (mit)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 312
Parchment · 159 ff. · 24.5-25.5 x 17-18 cm · first quarter of the 9th century
Isidor von Sevilla: Sententiae, lat.

A very interesting, completely edited and corrected manuscript of the three books of the Sententiae by Isidore of Seville. Compared to the main tradition, the form of the text is substantially different and contains numerous transpositions and additions. The manuscript was written at the Abbey of Saint-Mesmin, Micy, as evidenced by ownership labels (ex libris) written along the text area of each quire. In the middle there is a subsequently inserted binion (11th century), which contains, among others, parts of the Sermones by Fulbert of Chartres. (mit)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 366
Parchment · II + 159 ff. · 22.5-23.5 x 20.5-21 cm · second third of the 9th century
Valerius Maximus: Facta et dicta memorabilia

One of the earliest and most famous manuscripts of Valerius Maximus; its importance lies in the autograph reworkings by Lupus of Ferrières. Lupus himself wrote the Exempla and the comment on the sometime "flyleaves" (f. II-III), repeatedly collated the main text, added supplements from the parallel transmission of Iulius Paris (an abbreviator of Valerius Maximus) and also its accompanying text (Gaius Titius Probus: De praenominibus; f. 158va-159r). In making the fresh description a hitherto unnoticed letter- or charter-like text was discovered on the last page (f. 159v). (all/mit)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 756.84
Parchment · 2 ff. · 37 x 24.5 cm; 34.5 x 25 cm · 15th century
Plenarium (Fragment)

The two fragments come from the previous binding of Cod. 125‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬, from which they were removed during restoration; presumably they contain parts of a plenarium with musical notation. (mit)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Chironico, Archivio parrocchiale, n. 66
Parchment · I + 63 ff. · 33-34 x 24 cm · Chironico · around the middle of the 16th century
"Martirologio-calendario" (obituary) of the Parish of S. Ambrogio of Chironico

Obituary of the Parish of S. Ambrogio of Chironico (Ticino), written by the priest Ambrogio Rossi of Chironico, who copied an older obituary that was probably damaged or had no more space. The Ambrosian type calendar lists the stipends for annual masses or for anniversaries, the solemnities, the indulgences and notes regarding the pledges to the parish and to the entire valley. On December 28, the Feast of the Holy Innocents, the commemoration of the Battle of Giornico (Battaglia dei Sassi Grossi, 1479) is recorded. (ber)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 600a
Parchment · 74 pp. · 31.6 x 20.4 cm · Japan · 1596-1615
The Life of Buddha, first book (Shaka no Honji, jō)

The book belongs to the category of nara ehon, a type of polychrome, illustrated narratives published from the Muromachi period though to the first half of the Edo period. The term nara ehon has been widely applied to all illustrated books from these periods since the Meiji era, but its origin is unclear. The format of nara ehon differs, depending on the period. Early examples from the Momoyama to the very early Edo period are tall, measuring about 30 cm in height, a vertical format similar to a European quarto. The examples produced from the Kanei era onwards, within the first half of the Edo period were more of a horizontal proportion. They were also generally based on the genre of otogizōshi, short stories that emerged from the Kamakura period onwards, a majority of them focusing on the Muromachi period. During the latter half of the 17th century, the topic shifted to stories about the aristocracy or the wealthy merchant class, before the popularity nara ehon began to decline. This example can possibly dated to the Keichō era (1596-1615). (stn)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 600b
Parchment · 78 pp. · 31.5 x 20.5 cm · Japan · 1596-1615
The Life of Buddha, second book (Shaka no Honji, ge)

The book belongs to the category of nara ehon, a type of polychrome, illustrated narratives published from the Muromachi period though to the first half of the Edo period. The term nara ehon has been widely applied to all illustrated books from these periods since the Meiji era, but its origin is unclear. The format of nara ehon differs, depending on the period. Early examples from the Momoyama to the very early Edo period are tall, measuring about 30 cm in height, a vertical format similar to a European quarto. The examples produced from the Kanei era onwards, within the first half of the Edo period were more of a horizontal proportion. They were also generally based on the genre of otogizōshi, short stories that emerged from the Kamakura period onwards, a majority of them focusing on the Muromachi period. During the latter half of the 17th century, the topic shifted to stories about the aristocracy or the wealthy merchant class, before the popularity nara ehon began to decline. This example can possibly dated to the Keichō era (1596-1615). (stn)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 601a
Parchment · 57 ff. · 24.1 x 18 cm · 17th century
Tale of Ise, first book (Ise Monogatari, jō)

The Tale of Ise is one of the earliest and most well-known example of uta monogatari, a subgenre of the monogatari, which focuses on waka poetry with the narrative evolving around the poetry. Its authorship, as well as the exact date of composition remain unclear, but it is today dated to the early Heian period. It is also known by the title "Zaigo chūjō nikki", or "Diaries of the Prince Ariwara no Narihira". The main character in the Tale of Ise is understood as being the historical prince and poet Ariwara no Narihira (9th century), whose waka feature in the tale. Yet due to the existence of narratives that clearly date to later periods, Narihira himself cannot be regarded as the author. The tale is generally concerned with human affection of many kinds, from amorous affairs to parental affection. Whilst many chapters do have a strong aristocratic notion, it is not limited to the world of nobility, but also includes the commoner’s fate, such as Chapter 23 Tsutsuizutsu. The characters often remain unnamed and are only referred to as ‘the girl’, or ‘the man’. Thus, the tale is interpretable as an effort to generally address the topic of human relationship and affection. This example bound in silk is adorned with illustrations executed in ink, polychromy and gold. (stn)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 601b
Parchment · 48 ff. · 24 x 18 cm · 17th century
Tale of Ise, second book (Ise Monogatari, ge)

The Tale of Ise is one of the earliest and most well-known example of uta monogatari, a subgenre of the monogatari, which focuses on waka poetry with the narrative evolving around the poetry. Its authorship, as well as the exact date of composition remain unclear, but it is today dated to the early Heian period. It is also known by the title "Zaigo chūjō nikki", or "Diaries of the Prince Ariwara no Narihira". The main character in the Tale of Ise is understood as being the historical prince and poet Ariwara no Narihira (9th century), whose waka feature in the tale. Yet due to the existence of narratives that clearly date to later periods, Narihira himself cannot be regarded as the author. The tale is generally concerned with human affection of many kinds, from amorous affairs to parental affection. Whilst many chapters do have a strong aristocratic notion, it is not limited to the world of nobility, but also includes the commoner’s fate, such as Chapter 23 Tsutsuizutsu. The characters often remain unnamed and are only referred to as ‘the girl’, or ‘the man’. Thus, the tale is interpretable as an effort to generally address the topic of human relationship and affection. This example bound in silk is adorned with illustrations executed in ink, polychromy and gold. (stn)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 603
Paper · 1 f. · 23.6 x 883 cm · very likely 12th century
Daihannya-haramitta-kyō, kan gohyaku-yonjū (Sutra of Great Wisdom Chapter 540)

The handscroll of Daihannya-haramitta-kyō, the Sutra of Great Wisdom, chapter five hundred and forty, consists of a simple sheet of paper without mounting. The complete version of the sutra encompasses six-hundred chapters. It was introduced to China from India by the monk, scholar and translator Xuanzang, who translated the sutra into Chinese in the 7th century before it was imported into Japan. The sutra is written in black ink on high-quality paper, very likely kōzo-shi, which is made using the fibre of Broussonetia papyrifera or paper mulberry tree, especially treasured and used for important documents during the early periods of Japanese history such as the Nara and Heian periods. There is a circular red seal placed over the top of the first four lines of the text, stating “Yakushi-ji-in” (seal of the temple Yakushi-ji). The sutra was written in Japan within the context of the religious rites of reproducing holy scripture to benefit the karma. (stn)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, R-49.2
Paper · 38 pp. · 27.5 x 18.5 cm · December 1740
Rousseau, Mémoire présenté à M. de Mably sur l’éducation de M. son fils

The Mémoire présenté à M. de Mably sur l’éducation de M. son fils is Rousseau’s first writing related to his experience as an educator. In 1740 he took up a difficult position as tutor in the family of the notable Jean Bonnot de Mably, provost general of police in the Lyon region. This position came to an end after only one year. Two young children with little inclination to study had been entrusted to his care: François-Paul-Marie Bonnot de Mably, called Monsieur de Sainte-Marie, five and a half years old, and Jean-Antoine Bonnot de Mably, called Monsieur de Condillac, four and a half years old. The long Mémoire, dedicated to the older boy, emphasizes the “educational mission” and experience with practical education: it is presented as a plan and a synthesis; its writing has been dated around December 1740. The young tutor addresses M. de Mably and makes known to him the plan and structure for the education of his son in order to shape “the heart, the judgment and the spirit.” This is not the natural education, which later on will be advocated in ’Émile. Did Rousseau really present this Mémoire to M. de Mably? Known is only that he gave this manuscript of the Mémoire to Mme Dupin, his employer in 1743, and that since then it has been kept with the “Papers of Mme Dupin.” It was published for the first time in Paris in 1884 by G. de Villeneuve-Guibert in Le portefeuille de Madame Dupin. The Fondation Bodmer’s manuscript is the only one in existence. A Projet d’éducation, much shorter, more clearly structured and of unknown date, was found among Rousseau’s papers at the time of his death (this manuscript, now lost, was first published in Geneva in 1782). It is very similar to the Mémoire and seems to have been written (brc)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Frauenfeld, Katholisches Pfarrarchiv Frauenfeld, KPfAF III Bg 3
Parchment · 3 ff. · 170 x 114 cm · around 1250
Frauenfeld fragments from Konrad Fleck’s "Flore und Blanscheflur"

Around 1220 Konrad Fleck translated the romantic novel "Flore et Blancheflor", written in 1160 by an unknown Provençal poet, into High Alemannic. The complete work consists of about 8,000 verses. Several fragments of an early copy of Fleck’s translation have survived in the parish archives of Frauenfeld. The parchment pieces had been used as a cover for a tribute register from the prebend of St. Michael. (hux)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Genève, Bibliothèque de Genève, Ms. l.e. 206
Parchment · I + 123 + II ff. · 12.2 x 8 cm · Waldensian Valleys (Pellice, Germanasca, Chisone), Italy (?) · 15th century
Composite manuscript of Waldensian treatises and sermons

This manuscript was probably written in the 15th century in the Waldensian Valleys of Piedmont (Italy). As also with a large part of the remaining Waldensian manuscripts, now dispersed across various European libraries, this is a collection of various treatises, sermons and upraising or doctrinaire texts. This manuscript probably reached Geneva around 1661, where it was brought, together with other manuscripts, by the Waldensian pastor Jean Léger. Classified as a Spanish manuscript by Jean Senebier in 1779, it was not recognized as Waldensian until the middle of the 19th century. (gir)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Mairengo, Archivio parrocchiale, s. n.
Parchment · A + 61 + B ff. · 38 x 26.4 cm · Mairengo · 1563
"Martirologio-calendario" (obituary) of the Parish of S. Siro of Mairengo

Obituary of the Parish of S. Siro of Mairengo (Ticino), written by the priest Ambrogio Rossi of Chironico, who copied an older obituary that was probably damaged or had no more space. The Ambrosian type calendar lists the stipends for annual masses or for anniversaries, the solemnities, the indulgences and notes regarding the pledges to the parish and to the entire valley. On December 28, the Feast of the Holy Innocents, the commemoration of the Battle of Giornico (Battaglia dei Sassi Grossi, 1479) is recorded. (ber)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Porrentruy, Bibliothèque cantonale jurassienne, A2597
Paper · VI + 548 pp. · 34 x 21 cm · 1588-1773
Annales sive historia collegii Bruntrutiani ab anno…

This Latin chronicle was written by ninety-six successive hands. Until the abolition of the Jesuit Order in 1773, these annals, present the application of the Jesuits’ pedagogical principles in a pragmatic manner and over a long period of time, and also provide interesting information about the people. (rer)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Porrentruy, Bibliothèque cantonale jurassienne, A2598
Paper · 110 + 63 + 73 pp. · 34 x 21 cm · 18th century
Annals of the Monastery of the Sisters of the Annunciation…

Divided into three parts, this manuscript relates year by year all noteworthy events regarding the monastery. The document contains the religious vows, the deaths of the sisters as well as their obituaries, all of which are significant elements of the religious history of Porrentruy at this time. (rer)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Porrentruy, Bibliothèque cantonale jurassienne, MP 41
Paper · II + 149 pp. · 13 x 18 cm · 1821
Folk songs from the Ajoie

Book of folk songs from the Ajoie, collected by Antoine Biétrix. (rer)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Porrentruy, Bibliothèque cantonale jurassienne, MP 42 / A6054
Paper · IV + 78 pp. · 28 x 22 cm · 1880
Lai latre de Bonfô, qui contient les plus belles hichetoires…

This autograph by Antoine Biétrix contains anecdotes in patois which he collected and wrote down himself. The short stories give the people of Bonfol a terrible reputation. Even if the stories don’t concern the people of Bonfol directly, they are attributed to them, undoubtedly because the name of the village lends itself to such. (rer)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Porrentruy, Bibliothèque cantonale jurassienne, MP 43 / A6086
Paper · 680 + 11 pp. · 18 x 12 cm · around 1820
Ajoie Patois (dialect)

An autograph (?) of François-Joseph Guélat, from Adrien Kohler. This work is a regular encyclopedia of the patois; the main part consists of two large dictionaries French-Patois and Patois-French. In compiling this manuscript, F.-J. Guélat, who was from the Ajoie, draws upon the dialect of his region. (rer)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

Documents: 54, displayed: 1 - 20