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Location, Library Manuscripts
All libraries and collections1189
Sion/Sitten, Archives du Chapitre/Kapitelsarchiv 5
Fribourg/Freiburg, Archives de l'Etat de Fribourg/Staatsarchiv Freiburg 13
Sion/Sitten, Archives de l'Etat du Valais/Staatsarchiv Wallis 1
Bern, Burgerbibliothek 31
Porrentruy, Bibliothèque cantonale jurassienne 19
Fribourg/Freiburg, Bibliothèque cantonale et universitaire/Kantons- und Universitätsbibliothek 16
Lausanne, Bibliothèque cantonale et universitaire de Lausanne 4
Genève, Bibliothèque de Genève 48
Engelberg, Stiftsbibliothek 56
Sarnen, Benediktinerkollegium 10
Neuchâtel, Bibliothèque publique et universitaire de Neuchâtel 7
Trogen, Kantonsbibliothek Appenzell Ausserrhoden 12
St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek 537
Dalpe, Archivio parrocchiale 1
Solothurn, Domschatz der St.-Ursen-Kathedrale 3
Schlatt, Eisenbibliothek 1
Fribourg/Freiburg, Couvent des Cordeliers/Franziskanerkloster 13
Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer 118
Flawil, Gemeinde Flawil 2
Wil, Dominikanerinnenkloster St. Katharina 12
Aarau, Aargauer Kantonsbibliothek 13
Frauenfeld, Kantonsbibliothek Thurgau 16
Sion/Sitten, Médiathèque du Valais 2
Orselina, Convento della Madonna del Sasso 4
Luzern, Provinzarchiv Schweizer Kapuziner Luzern 1
Aarau, Staatsarchiv Aargau 6
Beromünster, Stiftskirche St. Michael 4
Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek 68
Schaffhausen, Stadtbibliothek 16
Zürich, Schweizerisches Nationalmuseum 5
St. Gallen, Stiftsarchiv (Abtei Pfäfers) 10
Bremgarten, Stadtarchiv Bremgarten 1
Sarnen, Staatsarchiv Obwalden 1
Schaffhausen, Staatsarchiv 5
Torre, Archivio parrocchiale 2
Basel, Universitätsbibliothek 15
Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum 14
St. Gallen, Kantonsbibliothek, Vadianische Sammlung 18
Solothurn, Zentralbibliothek 10
Zürich, Zentralbibliothek 46
Luzern, Zentral- und Hochschulbibliothek 15
Zofingen, Stadtbibliothek 2

Swiss Manuscripts Abroad

Country Location, Library Manuscripts
Germany Überlingen, Leopold-Sophien-Bibliothek 2
Austria St. Paul in Kärnten, Stiftsbibliothek St. Paul im Lavanttal 1

Dispersed Manuscript Parts Abroad

Country Location, Library Manuscripts
France Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France 1
United States of America Cleveland, The Cleveland Museum of Art 1
Russia St. Petersburg, National Library of Russia 1

Number of manuscripts: 44, displayed: 1 – 44

Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 85

Parchment · 147 ff. · 27–27.5 x 18 cm · Brittany · 2nd half of the 9th century

Biblia Latina (Vulgata): Evangelia

Manuscript from Brittany with the texts of the four Gospels, as well as the prologues and the chapter indexes for Mark, Luke and John. The artistic decoration comprises the 12 pages of the canon tables, the pictures of the evangelists dressed in priestly vestments, as well as initials at the beginning of each chapter and each Gospel. The rich interlace ornamentation suggests insular influences. (mit)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 87

Parchment · 18 ff. · 35.5–37 x 28.5 cm · Luxeuil · 1004

(Pseudo-)Boethius: Geometria; Excerpta Agrimensorum Romanorum

This manuscript from Luxeuil contains the Geometry falsely attributed to Boethius, as well as geometric and gromatic excerpts from Cassiodorus, Isidore and the agrimensores. It probably formed a codex together with the Aratea (Cod. 88) and was given to the Strasbourg Cathedral by Bishop Werner I. (mit)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 88

Parchment · 11 ff. · 37 x 28.5 cm · St. Bertin · Beginning of the 11th century

Aratus – Germanicus: Phaenomena

The Aratea, translated into Latin by the Roman Emperor Germanicus, describe the 48 ancient constellations and the myths concerning their origins. They are among the most popular picture cycles of medieval monastery schools. The Bernese codex, produced in St. Bertin, is a descendant of the Leiden Aratea and contains scholia which have survived only in this codex. (mit)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 219

Parchment · 2 + 77 + 2 ff. · 30.5 x 23 cm · France: Fleury; Reims? · 699

Eusebius-Hieronymus: Chronicon

The manuscript contains the second part of the Chronicle of Eusebius in the Latin translation and continuation of Jerome. The tables, generally laid out as double pages, are in the majority of cases condensed onto a single page. The book decoration is a superb example of pre-Carolingian manuscript illustration from the Frankish Empire and Northern Italy. From the detailed information on the title page, one can deduce that the text was written in 699; the Bernese Chronicle of Eusebius therefore is Switzerland’s oldest dated manuscript. (mit)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 234

Parchment · 69 ff. · 29.5 x 21.5 cm · Fulda / Reims (?) · second quarter of the 9th century and first third of the 9th century

Cassiodorus, Augustinus, Alcuinus, Audax Grammaticus

This 9th century manuscript is dedicated to the Artes; it consists of two parts, the first of which was written in Fulda around the second quarter of the 9th century. It contains the second book of Cassiodorus’ Institutiones, which is devoted to secular knowledge; since the 9th century, it has been preserved in several manuscripts in an interpolated version that contains Cassiodorus’ remarks on grammar, rhetoric, dialectic, arithmetic, music, geometry and astronomy, supplemented with excerpts from Quintilian, Boethius, Augustine and others. The second part was created a little earlier or simultaneously during the first third of the 9th century in Western France; it contains Alcuin’s Dialectica and excerpts from Audax Grammaticus. The two parts were already combined in the 9th century and were held in France. (stb)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 348

Parchment · 219 ff. · 25 x 20 cm · Fleury · around 820

Biblia Latina (Vulgata): Evangelia

Evangelary from Fleury, with the texts of the four Gospels, each preceded by two chapter indexes. Attached to the beginning is a quaternio with letters from Jerome to Pope Damasus and from Eusebius to Cyprian. The artistic decoration includes 15 canon tables as well as a picture of the hand of God with the symbols of the evangelists. (mit)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 720.1

Parchment · 2 ff. · 33 x 22 cm · France/Germany (?) · 10th/11th century

Annales Fuldenses (fragment)

10th/11th century fragment of unknown origin, containing parts of the Mainz continuation (up to the year 887) of the so-called Annales Fuldenses with entries for the years 871, 872 and 876. Based on the reading of the text, this exemplar belongs to a group of manuscripts that also contain the so-called Bavarian continuation of the Annals for the years 882 to 901. (stb)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 722.3

Parchment · 2 ff. · 21.5 x 17.5 cm · Fulda · 2nd quarter of the 9th century

Cetius Faventinus: Artis architectonicae privatis usibus adbreviatus liber (fragment)

Fragment of a manuscript that originated in Fulda around the second quarter of the 9th century, containing Cetius Faventinus’ (late 3rd/early 4th century) extracts from Vitruvius’ De Architectura. It cannot be determined when the codex left Fulda. Two Fulda library catalogs from the beginning and the middle of the 16th century still list a Faventinus manuscript. (stb)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Beromünster, Stiftskirche St. Michael, C 5 fol.

Parchment · 252 ff. · 34.5 x 24.5 cm · Southern Germany / Switzerland · 1474-1476

Missal from Hochdorf

This missal following the practice of the Diocese of Constance was written for the church in Hochdorf (Lucerne) in 1474-1475 by Johannes Dörfflinger, prebendary of Beromünster. The manuscript was commissioned for the new chaplainry of Sts. Peter and Paul, probably by its founder, the parish priest and dean Johannes Teller. It contains delicate filigreed initials at the beginning of the various liturgical sections and a full-page miniature of the Crucifixion (f. 106v), which introduces the Te igitur. Several pages originally left blank hold copies of the most important documents concerning the establishment of the prebend of Sts. Peter and Paul in Hochdorf (f. 78r-82v). (ber)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Beromünster, Stiftskirche St. Michael, Ms. C 14

Paper · 265 ff. · 21 x 15 cm · Beromünster · second half of the 14th century and 15th century

‚Compendium morale de avibus / de quadrupedibus‘ – Heinrich von Langenstein, ‚De discretione spiritum‘ – Johannes Gerson, ‚Opus tripartitum de praeceptis Decalogi, de confessione, et de arte moriendi‘ – Bonaventura, ‚De praeparatione ad missam‘ – ‚Moralitates super evangelium sancti Lucae‘ – Jacobus de Cessolis, ‚De ludo scachorum‘ (excerpts) – Sermon on Mary

Composite manuscript of catechetical-ascetic content, in quarto format on paper. Three fascicles of various strengths. The oldest is from the second half of the 14th century; it is written by Albert von Münnerstadt, Conventual from the Commandry of the Teutonic Knights of Hitzkirch, and contains Moralitates super evangelium sancti Lucae. In the second half of the 15th century, probably in Beromünster, this was bound together with two natural science Compendia moralia (excerpts from Thomas of Cantimpré’s encyclopedia) and with catechetical treatises by Heinrich von Langenstein, Johannes Gerson and Bonaventure. Scholarly manuscript for regular use in the area of pastoral care (hasty hand with numerous abbreviations, especially in the third fascicle). (luz)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Dalpe, Archivio parrocchiale, n. 1

Parchment · 6 ff. · 21/21.7 x 15 cm · Italy · 14th century

Passio s. Placidi

This parchment booklet from the parish archives of Dalpe (Leventina) contains the story of the suffering of St. Placidus of Disentis. Although the text is not complete, it contains a passage about the saint’s martyrdom, which is not included in the text’s principal manuscript held at the Zentralbibliothek of Zurich (Ms. Rh. 5). The community of Dalpe probably obtained this Passio so they could celebrate a yearly mass in honor of the saint in the new village chapel. The chapel had originally been dedicated to the Mary, but, as attested by documented sources, the patronage changed between 1370 and 1426, and the chapel was dedicated to St. Placidus. (ber)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 36(364)

Parchment · 260 pp. · 28.3 x 20.8 cm · Einsiedeln · 11th/12th century

[Godefridus Babio], Expositio super Mathaeum

The content consists mostly of an anonymous commentary on the Gospel of Matthew attributed to Geoffrey Babion, together with other short texts, not all of which have been identified. The manuscript probably originated in Einsiedeln, certainly it has been there since the 14th century as attested by various annotations and marks by Heinrich von Ligerz. (ber)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 134(805)

Parchment · a-d + 380 + y-z pp. · 20.7 x 14.2 cm · Raetia · 9th century

Hieronymus, in Evangelia

The first part of this manuscript (pp. 2-261) contains the Gospel of Matthew by Jerome and a sermon attributed to Isidore of Seville (pp. 261-262), while the second part (pp. 263-378) contains a copy of the Expositio quattuor evangeliorum by Pseudo-Jerome. Various scribes wrote this manuscript in a pre-Carolingian minuscule which may show characteristics of Raetian script. The influence of the Raetian script can clearly be seen in several initials (p. 2, 5, 62). (ber)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 196(488)

Parchment · a-b + I-II + 442 + y-z pp. · 25.8 x 17.5 cm · Einsiedeln · 12th century

Ivo Carnotensis, Panormia

The Panormia contains a collection of canon law texts, attributed to Ivo of Chartres, which apparently was edited after 1095. The codex probably originated in Einsiedeln and was written by a single scribe who used a regular and calligraphic Carolingian script. The text is divided into eight books, each introduced by an initial; of these eight initials, only one is executed in red, while for the others the preliminary drawings remain visible. (ber)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Engelberg, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. 1003

Parchment · 122 ff. · 22.5 x 16 cm · 12th/13th century

Antiphonarium cum notis musicis

The principal part of this manuscript consists of the Antiphonale. The mostly neumed Mass chants for the church year and for the saints’ days (ff. 3v-83v are supplemented with processional chants, litanies and a sequentiary (ff. 83v-109r). Bound into the manuscript at the beginning (ff. 1r-2v) and at the end (ff. 109r-122v) are 13th century supplements, among them a neumed German-language sequence dedicated to Mary (fol. 115r) and an elegy on the death of King Philip of Swabia of the House of Hohenstaufen, who was murdered in 1208 (fol. 117v). (keg)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Fribourg/Freiburg, Couvent des Cordeliers/Franziskanerkloster, Ms. 51

Paper · A + XII + 167 + B ff. · 22 x 14.7 cm · Strasbourg · 1364

Composite manuscript with Quaestiones morales pulcrae et modernae

This composite manuscript was compiled by Konrad von Sulzbach in 1364, when he was a student in Strasbourg. After the first part of the collection containing the commentary by Gregory of Rimini OESA was lost, the manuscript was rebound in the last decade of the 14th century in Fribourg (Switzerland) with 37 Quaestiones determinatae (f. 1r-110v), with other questions (110v-119v and 153v-167r), and with the summary of the Sentenzen by Johannes de Fonte (f. 120r-153r). The 37 Quaestiones, which reveal the influence of the English Franciscan School, are found only in this manuscript. (flu)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Fribourg/Freiburg, Couvent des Cordeliers/Franziskanerkloster, Ms. 60

Paper · 262 ff. · 21.5 x 14.5 cm · Munich (?) and Fribourg (Switzerland) · before 1419

Franciscan composite manuscript

This composite manuscript, much used by Friedrich von Amber, contains material about the history of the religious order in the first part (f. 1r-100v). In the second, probably more important part (f. 109r-165v), it contains treatises, questions and polemics from the time of the conflict of Pope John XXII with Louis IV (called the Bavarian) who resided in Munich and with the Franciscan Spirituals who had fled to that city. Several of these writings are preserved only in this manuscript, among them a treatise on the Visio beatifica of 1332-1333 (f. 127v-153r) which, according to Annelise Maier can possibly be attributed to William of Ockham, as well as a polemic (f. 153r-160r) in which Louis IV is warned against too hastily making peace with the Pope in Avignon. (flu)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Genève, Bibliothèque de Genève, Ms. fr. 76

Parchment · I-II + 263 ff. · 39 x 28 cm · Bruges · about 1475-1500

Quintus Curtius Rufus, Faits et gestes d’Alexandre

Vasco de Lucena translated Quintus Curtius’ history of Alexander into French at the request of Isabella of Portugal, the wife of Philip III, Duke of Burgundy. The translator drew on texts by Plutarch and Justin in order to complete the Roman writer’s text which contains gaps. The translation, completed in 1468, presents Alexander as conqueror, devoid of all legends transmitted through courtly literature; it is dedicated to Charles the Bold, the son of Isabella. This copy from the Bibliothèque de Genève was illustrated by a Flemish artist, Maître d’Edouard IV, who was active in Bruges around the end of the 15th century, as well as by a second hand not yet definitively identified. (hoc)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Genève, Bibliothèque de Genève, Ms. fr. 160

Parchment · (I-III) + 200 + (IV-VI) ff. · 39 x 29 cm · Rouen · about 1450-1480

Brunetto Latini, the 'Trésor'

The Florentine writer and notary Brunetto Latini went into exile in 1260, after the Guelphs lost the Battle of Montaperti. Until 1266 he took up residence in France, where he wrote the Trésor, an encyclopedia written in French that was widely used until the end of the 15th century. The illuminator of the Bibliothèque de Genève’s copy of the manuscript is known as the "Master of the Geneva Latini" or as the "Maître de l'échevinage de Rouen.” Originally decorated with four frontispieces, the manuscript today has only two, one of which is a famous representation of a medieval urban market. (hoc)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Porrentruy, Bibliothèque cantonale jurassienne, Ms. 4

Parchment and paper · 200 ff. · 29 x 21 cm · Southwestern Germany · 3rd quarter of the 15th century

Aristoteles, Ethica Nicomachea

This manuscript contains a Latin version of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, translated and glossed by Robert Grosseteste (1175-1253), Bishop of Lincoln. The decoration of monochrome as well as red and blue fleuronné initials at the beginning of the chapters (e.g., 3r) and the colorfully decorated initials at the beginning of the books (e.g., 1r) attest to an origin in Southwestern Germany in the third quarter of the 15th century. The manuscript was originally part of the episcopal library; during the French Revolution it came to the library of the Jesuit College of Porrentruy; in the 20th century it finally became part of the collection of the Library of the Canton of Jura. (wid)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Porrentruy, Bibliothèque cantonale jurassienne, Ms. 6a

Paper · 304 ff. · 40 x 29 cm · Southwestern Germany (Basel?) · 2nd third of the 15th century

Biblia Sacra, pars prima

First part of a Bible (second part in Ms. 6b) containing the books of the Old Testament from Genesis to Iesus Sirach. The manuscript was produced in the same workshop as Ms. 6b and 6c; based on the style of the initials, it was made in Southwestern Germany during the second third of the 15th century. The decoration consists of small red and blue filigreed initials for the prologues and of larger ornamental initials at the beginning of the books. The manuscript is mentioned in the inventory of Prince-Bishop Philipp von Gundelsheim (1487-1553); according to a note on f. 1r, during the 19th century it became the property of the Jesuit College of Porrentruy, after which it became part of the collection of the Library of the Canton of Jura. (wid)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Porrentruy, Bibliothèque cantonale jurassienne, Ms. 6b

Paper · 228 ff. · 40 x 29 cm · Southwestern Germany (Basel?) · 2nd third of the 15th century

Biblia Sacra, pars altera

Second part of a Bible (first part in Ms. 6a) which, as also Ms. 6a and 6c, was produced in Southwestern Germany during the second third of the 15th century. The manuscript consists of two parts: the first part contains the remaining books of the Old Testament (Isaia to II Maccabeorum), the second part contains those of the New Testament. The books in the second part (105r-219v) are introduced by historiated or ornamental initials, while the beginnings of the chapters have blue red filigreed initials. The manuscript is mentioned in the inventory of Prince-Bishop Philipp von Gundelsheim (1487-1553); according to a note on f. 1r, during the 19th century it became the property of the Jesuit College of Porrentruy, after which it became part of the collection of the Library of the Canton of Jura. (wid)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Porrentruy, Bibliothèque cantonale jurassienne, Ms. 10

Parchment · 212 ff. · 14.5 x 10 cm · France · between 1463 and 1498

Pontifical of Charles de Neufchâtel, Archbishop of Besançon

15th century Pontifical. The ceremonies are represented as full page miniatures with ornamental initials, marginal decorations and several lines of text on the model of books of hours; in the text there are many colorful borders and ornamental initials, often with depictions of the liturgical objects mentioned in the text. In addition to the frequently recurring coat of arms of Melchior von Lichtenfels, Archbishop of Basel (1554-1575), there is the coat of arms of Charles de Neufchâtel, Archbishop of Besançon (1463-1498; visible on f. 1r), which gives an indication of the manuscript’s date of origin. As many other manuscripts from religious institutions, this manuscript came into the possession of the Jesuit College of Porrentruy during the French Revolution, until in the 20th century it became part of the collection of the Library of the Canton of Jura. (wid)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Porrentruy, Bibliothèque cantonale jurassienne, Ms. 13

Paper · 331 ff. · 28 x 20 cm · Hildesheim · 1452

Vocabularius brevilogus

According to the colophon on f. 329v, this Vocabularius brevilogus was copied by the scribe Martinus Hartmann in Hildesheim in 1452. The lemmas are set off by rubricated initials; space was left for larger initials which, with few exceptions, were not realized. In 1505 the then-owner of the manuscript, Johannes Hertlin from Augusta Regia, donated it to the Church of Sts. Alexander and Theodor in Ottobeuren; in the 20th century it has been in the possession of the Library of the Canton of Jura. (wid)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Porrentruy, Bibliothèque cantonale jurassienne, Ms. 17

Parchment · 92 ff. · 34 x 26 cm · Diocese of Basel · 2nd half of the 15th century

Psalterium-hymnarium basileense

A 15th century Psalter following the liturgical custom of the Collegiate Church of Saint-Ursanne; in form and content it is a perfect copy of the Basel manuscript AN VIII 39. Both pastedowns consist of fragments of Vincent of Beauvais’ Speculum historiale; on f. 36r there is a 16th century pen drawing of the Virgin Mary. The manuscript remained in the Collegiate Church of Saint-Ursanne until it came into the possession of the Library of the Canton of Jura in the 20th century. (wid)

Online since: 09/23/2014

Porrentruy, Bibliothèque cantonale jurassienne, Ms. 21

Parchment · 140 ff. · 17.5 x 12 cm · 13th/14th century

Florilegium

This 13th/14th century florilegium cites mainly the saints Bernard, Augustine and Gregory as well as biblical books with the Glossa ordinaria, Ambrose, Seneca, Aristotle and many others. The pastedowns consist of 12th century parchment fragments on which several lines from Virgil’s Georgica are legible. (wid)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 334

Parchment · 480 pp. · 39.5 x 25.5 cm · Northern France? · around 1200

Petrus Lombardus, Collectanea in epistolas Pauli

This manuscript contains the commentary on the Epistles of Paul (Collectanea in epistolas Pauli) by Peter Lombard (1095/1100-1160). On the spine label and on p. 1/2, it is falsely attributed to Pierre de Tarentaise (later Pope Innocent V). The codex is written in two columns; the left, often very narrow column gives the biblical text, the right one gives the commentary in lines of half the height. References to authors consulted by Peter Lombard are given in red in the margins. At the beginning of each letter, there are two initials (for the biblical text and for the commentary) painted in opaque colors on a gold background p. (3, 5, 116, 202, 249, 287, 316, 334/335, 351, 371, 402, 409, 412). These exhibit features of the so-called „channel style,“ which was popular on both sides of the English Channel around 1200. (sno)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 442

Parchment · 159 pp. · 18.2 x 13.2 cm · Monastery of St. Gall (Fr. Heinrich Keller) · around 1555

Ritual from the post-Reformation Monastery of St. Gall

Ritual for the personal use of Prince-Abbot of St. Gall Diethelm Blarer (1530−1564; cf. his coat of arms on p. 8 and the stamp for his personal library on p. 7); written by the St. Gall monk Heinrich Keller (1518−1567) and illustrated around 1555 by an unknown illuminator from the area of Lake Constance. The St. Gall manuscripts Cod. Sang. 357 and Cod. Sang. 439 were illuminated by this same artist at the same time. The small-format volume contains liturgical texts on the administration of the sacrament of baptism (pp. 9-107), on the readmission of a woman into the circle of believers after giving birth (pp. 107-114), on marriage (pp. 114-141), as well as on the distribution of wine on October 16th, the feast day of Saint Gall, the founder of St. Gall (pp. 144a-154). (smu)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 443

Parchment · 86 pp. · 21-22 x 16.5 cm · Monastery of St. Gall · 15th century and 1563

Ritual; preface to Manfred Barbarini Lupus’ compositions for several voices in Cod. Sang. 542 and 543

This manuscript consists of two-parts bound together; the first part (pp. 3-26) contains a 15th century ritual with instructions for visits to the sick, for spiritual care for the dying, and for burial (this is cut off in the prayer at the coffin on p. 26). The second part (pp. 27-86) consists of two discourses in defense of polyphonic music, composed by St. Gall monk Mauritius Enck (†1575) at the behest of Abbot Diethelm Blarer (1530-1564). These discourses are meant as prefaces to Manfred Barbarini Lupus’ compositions for several voices in Cod. Sang. 542 and 543. Enck defends polyphonic music against widespread criticism, for example for its presumed lascivia („wantonness“), and postulates an ideal for church music consisting of a combination with a chorale as the foundation and figural music as embellishment. Thus he describes precisely the compositions of Barbarini Lupus. At the end of the first discourse (pp. 47-48), Enck names the artists who contributed to Cod. Sang. 542 and 543 as well as the time period of their work on the manuscripts (from 1561 to 1563). (sno)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 452

Parchment · 268 pp. · 32 x 19/20 cm · Monastery of St. Gall (Fridolin Sicher) · 1542/43

Chapter office book with the Rule of Saint Benedict, a martyrology and a necrology of St. Gall

Meant for daily use in the chapter office, this volume was written in 1542/43 by the secular cleric Fridolin Sicher (1490−1546), born in Bischofszell, for St. Gall Prince-Abbot Diethelm Blarer (1530−1564; cf. his coat of arms on p. 5 and p. 8 as well as p. 268); later the volume came into the possession of the monastic community of St. Gall. Before as well as after the Reformation, Fridolin Sicher was cathedral organist and calligrapher for St. Gall Abbey. In the front of the volume there is a Latin copy of the Rule of Saint Benedict (pp. 5-72), followed in the later part by an abridged version, consolidated into a single draft, of the Martyrologium Romanum and a necrology related to St. Gall Abbey (pp. 83-267). Under Prince-Abbot Bernhard Müller (1594−1630), this chapter office book was replaced with a new necrology begun in 1611 (cf. Cod. Sang. 1442) that no longer contained the Rule of Saint Benedict. (smu)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 461

Parchment · 94 pp. · 17.5 x 14 cm · Monastery of St. Gall (Fridolin Sicher) · before 1545

Fridolin Sicher’s Song Book

Song collection of St. Gall organist Fridolin Sicher; 49 songs for three to five voices in 16th century mensural notation without texts. Among the composers are, among others, Alexander Agricola, Loyset Compère, Josquin Desprez and Jacob Obrecht. Several pieces give the name of the composer and the beginning of the text (in French, Italian, Flemish or Latin). Usually one piece fills a double page, less frequently all (three or four) voices are arranged on a single page (dor)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 587

Paper · 463 pp. · 21 x 14.5/15 cm · St. Gall · 14th century and 15th century

Lives of St. Gall and other saints, in verse ∙ The book Floretus ∙ Sermons by Peregrine of Opole and Jacobus de Voragine

Composite manuscript containing lives of saints in verse and other theological texts: life of St. Gall, in verse (Vita Galli metrice), possibly written by an Irish scholar (Moengal?) around 850 (pp. 3-175); miracles of Mary, in verse (Miracula Marie) (pp. 176-191); Vita sancti Viti, in verse (pp. 192-204); Vita scolastica by Bonvicinus de Ripa, in verse (pp. 205-241); Facetus de vita et moribus (pp. 242-267); Liber floretus by a Pseudo-Bernard (pp. 268-287); Sermones by Peregrine of Opole (pp. 306-352); Sermones by Jacobus de Voragine (pp. 353-363); and Sermones dominicales, pars aestivalis et per totum annum by Peregrine of Opole and Jacobus de Voragine (pp. 368-452). (dor)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 754

Paper · 171 pp. · 21.5 x 15.5 cm · Glarus · 1466

Collection of German medical texts

Collection of German medical texts. The beginning is missing, then the Ordnung der Gesundheit for Rudolf von Hohenberg (pp. 3-60); various recipes for medicine, magic and food (pp. 63-101), among them a treatise on vultures and verbena from the Bartholomäus (pp. 64-69); „Verworfene Tage“ (pp. 69-71); a recipe for vinegar (pp. 73-76); an excerpt from the Buch der Natur by Conrad of Megenberg (pp. 82-85); recipes making use of „Schwalbenstein“ (pp. 89-90); prognostics for the new year and for thunder (pp. 90-94); recipes for wine (pp. 95-101). Herbal book with excerpts from the Macer Floridus by Odo von Meung (pp. 101-146); medical recipes (pp. 146-147); applications for medicines according to the Macer Floridus (pp. 147-161); recipe against the ritten (p. 162). At the end on p. 164 there is a colored sketch of Agrimonia (Odermennig). The manuscript, originally from the library of Aegidius Tschudi (no. 117), is related to the 2° Cod. 572 of the Staats- und Stadtbibliothek Augsburg. (dor)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 755

Paper · 188 pp. · 22.5 x 16 cm · Eastern Switzerland · second half of the 15th century

Collection of German medical texts

Collection of German medical texts. Recipes for medicines (pp. 1-148) with an index (pp. 149-157), more recipes added later (pp. 158-168), instructions for bloodletting (pp. 169-184), German and Latin incantations (pp. 185-186), excerpts from De pestilentia by Theobaldus Loneti (pp. 187-188). The manuscript is from the library of Aegidius Tschudi (no. 118). (dor)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 756

Paper · 264 pp. · 21.5 x 15 cm · Southern Germany/Switzerland · 1st half of the 15th century

Composite manuscript on geomancy, chiromancy, iatromathematics, astronomy, alchemy and medicine

Composite manuscript in Latin and German. The texts, which are presented in no systematic order, can be grouped as follows. Geomancy: Latin treatise with schematic drawings (pp. 1-152, 163-169); other geomantic schemata (185, 236, 263 [incorrectly paginated as 262]). Medicine: recipes, in German (pp. 153-162 and 197-198); examination of the blood after bloodletting and instructions for bloodletting, in German (pp. 193-196, 255-261). Iatromathematics: lunarium, in Latin (pp. 169-172); planets and the attributes of their corresponding hours / of the persons born under their sign, in German, partly in rhymed verse (pp. 173-175, 178-179, 218, 240); tables for determining which planets govern which hours (p. 200, 240); signs of the zodiac, their characteristics and their influence on the people born under them, in Latin (pp. 180-185, 186 [hexameter]) and German (pp. 187-192), directions and tables for calculating the position of the moon in the zodiac (pp. 177-178, 213-214, [215b]-216 [for the years 1406-1480]); diagram of the zodiac (p. 262); drawing of the parts of the fingers correlated with signs of the zodiac, temperaments and elements (p. 264 [incorrectly paginated as 263]); monthly rules, in Latin (p. 215-[215a]). Astronomy: calendar (pp. 201-212); tables for calendar calculations (pp. 237, 241-242, 254); table of lunar eclipses for the years 1422-1462, with drawings of the respective degree of coverage (pp. 238-239 and 243). Prognostication: prognostics for thunder, in German (p.199); prognostics for the new year, in Latin (p. 217). Alchemy: recipes for alchemy, in Latin (pp. 219-220) and in German (pp. 221-228). Treatise on chiromancy, in German, commencing with a colored pen drawing of two hands with the lines of the hands (pp. 244-254). Other items: incantations, in German (p. 156) and in Latin (p.219); four hexameters about the quality of wine, in Latin (p. 264 [incorrectly paginated as 263]). The manuscript, written in various hands, is from the library of Aegidius Tschudi (no. 104). (dor/sno)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 760

Paper · 154 pp. · 21 × 15.5 cm · Southern Germany/Switzerland · around 1450

Iatromathematical housebook from the Southern German/Swiss region

This manuscript, illustrated with numerous colored pen drawings, originated in a secular environment in Southern Germany or in Switzerland around the middle of the 15th century. It describes the signs of the zodiac, the planets, the four temperaments, and the four seasons regarding their influence on human health. This is followed by dietary guidelines primarily regarding bloodletting, but also regarding eating, drinking, sleeping, waking, resting and moving, as well as, in concrete terms, regarding bathing (illustration p. 101) or defecating (illustration p. 120). Most likely an amateur doctor with an interest in astronomy, from the Southern region of Germany, wrote the original text around 1400 and assembled it into a compendium. Later the text was repeatedly supplemented and modified. The last part (from p. 128 on) contains a prose and a poem version of the so-called letter from Pseudo-Aristotle to Alexander the Great, in which the Greek universal scholar advises the king on maintaining good health. (smu)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 777

Parchment · 108 pp. · 20.5 × 14.5 cm · probably Monastery of St. Gall · 12th century

Excerpts from texts by church fathers on questions regarding the church and baptism; Julian of Toledo, "Prognosticum futuri saeculi"

This composite manuscript is written in a delicate script, probably in the 12th century at the Monastery of St. Gall; its first part (pp. 1-50) contains excerpts from writings by church fathers (Augustine, Gregory the Great, Jerome, etc.) about the church (de catholica ecclesia) and about the sacrament of baptism. This is followed in the second part (pp. 51-88) by a copy of Prognosticum futuri saeculi by Julian of Toledo (around 644-690), which is also preserved in Cod. Sang. 264. This work presents the Christian Church’s first attempt of formulating a comprehensive view of death and of the last things. At the end of the manuscript, which from p. 99 on has bigger and bigger holes in the parchment, there are a number of liturgical texts on rituals, such as on the vestments of bishops, on the Mass or on excommunication. (smu)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 928

Paper · 258 [260] pp. · 21.5 × 14.5 cm · Monastery of St. Gall · around 1440

Composite manuscript on monastic subjects from the first half of the 15th century containing the 'Consuetudines' of Subiaco-Wiblingen and Kastl

This composite manuscript from the Monastery of St. Gall is significant in terms of textual history; it contains copies of monastic texts regarding reform movements of the first half of the 15th century. Among other texts it contains the Consuetudines Sublacenses (pp. 119), the Consuetudines of a Cistercian monastery in Bohemia (pp. 2674; Directorium et consuetudines monasterii de Nepomuk ord. Cist. in Bohemia), general and liturgical directives for monastic life (pp. 7487), disparaging remarks by a monk from Hersfeld staying in St. Gall about the reform efforts of the general chapter (pp. 98108), as well as the Consuetudines Castellenses (pp. 113258). The latter contain liturgical directives for the worship service as well as rules for daily life in and for the organization of the monastic community of Kastl in the Upper Palatinate (Bavaria). Later these Consuetudines circulated widely and influenced monastic life in many other monasteries in Southern Germany, including in St. Gall. Cod. Sang. 928 is the only manuscript to preserve the original prologue about these reforms by Abbot Otto Nortweiner of Kastl (1378−1399). The manuscript’s original limp vellum binding was restored in the 19th or early 20th century with severe alterations to the original substance of the codex. (smu)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 932

Paper · 578 pp. · 15.2 × 11 cm · Monastery of St. Gall, possibly owned for a time by Fr. Gallus Kemli · probably 1437−1443

Composite manuscript on monastic subjects from the first half of the 15th century

Several scribes contributed to the writing of this small-format manuscript between 1437 and 1443, among them Gallus Kemli, the wandering monk of St. Gall (1417−1481). The manuscript with the spine label Miscellanea Regularia Liturgica et Medica is preserved in its original binding; in addition to the Consuetudines Sublacenses, it contains more reformist writings from the late medieval reform movements of Subiaco and Melk. These writings include prayers of grace at meals which vary throughout the church year according to the feast days (pp. 99-117), numerous liturgical texts and calendar calculations. At the back there are medical treatises, among them (p. 480) mnemonic aids regarding bloodletting (pp. 569-571), and the pseudo-Aristotelian treatise Secretum Secretorum, a sort of encyclopedic secret doctrine with oriental characteristics that has been preserved in numerous manuscripts. The table of contents on the inside front cover was written between 1774 and 1780 by Fr. Magnus Hungerbühler (1732−1811), while he was abbey librarian. (smu)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 947

Paper · 112 pp. · 21.8 x 15 cm · Monastery of St. Gall (?) · 15th century

Composite manuscript containing, among others, alphabetically ordered excerpts of texts by church fathers and a characterization of peoples in Medieval Latin verses

This manuscript in its original limp vellum binding contains as its main part (pp. 1-88; index p. 93) alphabetically ordered excerpts in Latin from writings by church fathers on various theological concepts (De abiectione – De voto). These are followed by shorter texts. On p. 89 there is a little-know characterization of peoples and tribes (especially from regions within Germany) in Medieval Latin verses; it is titled Versus de provinciis and it begins with Roma potens, reverenda Ravenna, Britannia pauper. Pp. 90-92 preserve a letter from a Parisian university teacher (Epistola cuiusdam egregii magistri parisiensis) about the evil of property, followed by an interpretation of the Lord's Prayer in Latin (pp. 94-100) and by more spiritual-ascetic texts in Latin (pp. 106-112) and in German. The table of contents on the inside front cover was written by Fr. Jodocus Metzler (1574−1639), longtime abbey librarian. (smu)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 958

Paper · 222 pp. · 22 × 15 cm · Southern Germany / Northern Switzerland · 1521

Frau Tugendreich

This only surviving copy of the prose story „Frau Tugendreich“ was written by an unknown author in the circle of Emperor Maximilian I in the second decade of the 16th century. The text is a mixture of a ‘Zeitroman’ (a novel giving a critical analysis of an age) and a debate about the value of women or the lack thereof. An external narrative frame presents a discussion between a young narrator beholden to the courtly ideal and his more experienced master, who clings to a traditional view of women, about the value, significance and conduct of women. Unfortunately from p. 196 on, essential parts of the text have been lost due to missing pages. This copy, written in East Swabian dialect by scribe A. S. (p. 219), is dated 1521. (smu)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 1442

Parchment · 132 pp. · 26 x 17.5 cm · Monastery of St. Gall · 1611

Necrology of the Monastery of St. Gall

This necrology was compiled in 1611 from older books of the dead at the behest of Prince-Abbot Bernhard Müller (1594-1630); it replaces the necrology in Cod. Sang. 452. The records were continued until 1847. In addition to abbots, monks and lay brothers from the monastery, the register also lists persons who were admitted into the confraternity as benefactors of the monastery. Later entries indicate the year of death, occasionally also the place of death or of burial. The age of the deceased is mentioned only in exceptional cases. The last pages (pp. 126-131) contain directions for Masses for the dead and similar forms of commemoration of the dead. According to a note by Franz Weidmann (p. 1), after the secularization of the monastery the manuscript temporarily was in the possession of Fr. Aemilianus Hafner, who gave it to the library in 1840. (sno)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 2106

Parchment · 4 ff. · 21-22 x 23 / 28-28.5 x 22.5-24 cm · Switzerland · middle or second half of the 9th century

Fragment from a passionary: Vita sancti Galli vetustissima, Laudatio Lucae evangelistae, Passio Simonis et Iudae apostolorum

These two parchment double leaves were found in 1895 by state archivist Paul Schweizer in book bindings in the State Archives of Zurich; they were held there under the shelfmark C VI 1 II 8a until 2006. As conclusion to the long-term dispute about cultural assets between St. Gall and Zurich, the Canton of Zurich donated these fragments to the Abbey Library of St. Gall on 27 April 2006. The leaves are from a passionary; they contain eleven partially fragmentary chapters of the oldest version of the life of St. Gall (Vita sancti Galli vetustissima) as well as the beginnings of the Passions of the evangelist Luke and the apostles Simon and Judas. The latter text (for October 28th) has the number 80, suggesting that the passionary once comprised more than 90 texts. (sno)

Online since: 09/23/2014

St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, Cod. Sang. 2107

Parchment · 111 ff. · 15.2 × 10.5 cm · Switzerland/Southern Germany, perhaps written for a St. Gall monk · 1475/1500

Latin Book of Hours (property of a St. Gall monk?)

Late medieval prayer book. The first part contains an incomplete Office of the Virgin (fol. 1r-45v) with variants for Advent and for the time period between Christmas and Candlemas (fol. 46r-51v), Absolutions, Benedictions, Orations and other short prayers (fol. 51v-68r). The Office of the Dead (fol. 69r-98v), including Vespers, Vigil, and prayers for the anniversaries of the deaths of priests, abbots and other deceased persons, is followed by prayers of indulgence (fol. 99r-111v). The beginning of the Office of the Virgin as well as possibly a calendar preceding it have been lost. The fact that the patron saints of St. Gall, St. Gall and St. Othmar (fol. 56r-56v; fol. 58r-58v), are the only saints mentioned other than Mary and St. Benedict suggests a provenience from the Monastery of St. Gall. The manuscript is written in Gothic script; it is decorated with numerous initials executed in gold leaf and with colorful vine scrolls in the margins of individual pages. The beginning of the Office of the Dead (fol. 69r) is adorned with a small miniature of a catafalque bordered by two Benedictine monks, one of which is holding a prayer book in his hands. The cut leather binding with the monogram S, created by a master whose name is unknown, is particularly noteworthy. The covers show the two Princes of the Apostles, Peter (front cover, with book and key) and Paul (back cover, with book and sword), surrounded by rich vine scroll ornamentation. The Abbey Library of St. Gall was able to acquire this manuscript in June 2006 at a Christie’s auction in New York from the collection of the American brewer Cornelius J. Hauck (1893−1967) from Cincinnati (Ex Libris on the inside front cover). (smu)

Online since: 09/23/2014
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