Documents: 53, displayed: 1 - 20

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, A VII 27a
Paper · 172 ff. · 22 x 15.5 cm · Carthusian Monastery in Basel · 1489
Epithalamium sive soliloquium beatae Mariae virginis

This volume was written in 1489 by Ambrosius Alantsee (†1505). Ambrosius, originally from Füssen, enrolled at the University of Basel in 1468/69 and, as can be proven, wrote several mostly liturgical books between 1484 and 1492 at the Carthusian Monastery in that city. Among them is this Epithalamium (bridal or wedding song) for Mary. Possibly this is the same Ambrosius Alantsee who is attested as prior of St. Mang's Abbey in Füssen in 1491. (stu)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, A IX 92
Paper · 163 ff. · 21.5-22 x 15-15.5 cm · Vienna · 1399-1400
Super Sententias Petri Lombardi

This manuscript of university lecture notes on the Sentences of Peter Lombard was written by Heinrich von Weinfelden in Vienna in 1399/1400, during his studies at the university there. Together with its writer, this volume went to the Dominican Monastery of Basel, where it became part of the library. (flr)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, A X 121
Paper · 33 ff. · 21 x 15 cm · Basel · around 1500
Obsequiale Carthusian Monastery in Basel

This obsequiale, written by Prior Jacob Lauber in his own hand, governs the Office of the Dead at the Carthusian Monastery in Basel. The inserted prayers (among them the Lord's Prayer in Latin and in German) as well as the chants with musical notation are situated in a liturgical context. (stu)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, A XI 61
Paper · 159 ff. · 14.5 x 10.5 cm · Upper German speaking area · 2nd half of the 15th century
Prayer and devotional book with the Office of the Virgin

This German devotional book was written by a single hand; it is from the library of the lay brothers of the Carthusian Monastery in Basel. In addition to the Office of the Virgin, which is at the beginning and takes up about half of the manuscript, this codex also preserves various prayers and other devotional texts. (stu)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, AN II 36
Paper · 362 ff. · 39 x 28.5 cm · Upper German linguistic area · last third of the 15th century
Biblia germanica, 1st part

Manuscripts AN II 36 and AN II 37 together constitute a complete Bible in German. This is a copy of the so-called “Mentelin Bible” [printed in Strasbourg by Johannes Mentelin, prior to 27 June 1466] and of the “Pflanzmannbibel.” In the 17th century, both manuscripts were owned by Peter Werenfels (1627-1703), professor of theology and pastor at St. Leonhard in Basel. (stu)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, AN II 37
Paper · 432 ff. · 39 x 28.5 cm · Upper German linguistic area · last third of the 15th century
Biblia germanica, 2nd part

Manuscripts AN II 36 and AN II 37 together constitute a complete Bible in German. This is a copy of the so-called “Mentelin Bible” [printed in Strasbourg by Johannes Mentelin, prior to 27 June 1466] and of the “Pflanzmannbibel.” In the 17th century, both manuscripts were owned by Peter Werenfels (1627-1703), professor of theology and pastor at St. Leonhard in Basel. (stu)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, C V 16
Parchment · 266 ff. · 24.5 x 16 cm · France (?) · beginning of the 14th century
Godefridus de Trano: Summa super rubricis decretalium

This manuscript, a composite manuscript of legal content, has as its main text the Summa super rubricis decretalium by the Italian legal scholar Godefridus de Trano (deceased 1245). This is a textbook on the Compilation of Decretals commissioned by Pope Gregory IX, which was widely distributed. The text is decorated with five small figure initials, probably of French origin. (flr)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, F I 1
Parchment · 283 ff. · 34-35 x 22.5-23 cm · France · beginning of the 14th century
Aristotle: The writings on logic

This manuscript, of French origin, came to the Carthusian Monastery of Basel after having been the property of Johannes Heynlin. The massive volume contains Aristotle's six works on logic, some with commentary, which were assembled into the so-called “Organon“ only after the time of Aristotle. The decoration and science are complementary: each of the books of the main text begins with an elaborate ornamental initial; the commentary, if there is one, is grouped closely around the main text and is mostly unadorned. (flr)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, F IV 12
Paper · 110 ff. · 29.5 x 21 cm · around 1400
Vocabularia

This manuscript transmits various Latin-German vocabularies, among them the Mammotrectus by the Italian Franciscan John Marchesinus, which was written around 1300. This manuscript, written around 1400 by a certain Ulrich Wachter, was purchased for the Carthusian monastery of Basel in 1430. (stu)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, F VI 60
Paper · 284 ff. · 21-22 x 15-15.5 cm · 3rd quarter of the 15th century
Johannes Rucherath de Wesalia

This manuscript contains exercises and Quaestiones on Aristotle’s works De anima and De physica by the reform theologian Johann von Wesel (1425-1481). This volume is from the Carthusian monastery of Basel; based on a comparative study of the script, it can be assumed that the scribe of the first part is Jakob Louber. Numerous annotations in the margins and on slips of paper attest that the manuscript was heavily used. (flr)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, M III 5
Paper · 130 pp. · 21 x 16 cm · 17th century (before 1682)
Avicenna, Manẓūma fī ăṭ-ṭibb

Didactic poem in Arabic by Avicenna (d. 1037) about the art of healing. The manuscript was written in the 17th century on paper of European provenance and came to the university library in 1682 as a gift from Konrad Harber. According to the canon, the Urǧūza (or Manẓūma) fī ṭ-ṭibb is the Persian scholar’s greatest contribution to medicine. Armengaud Blaise translated it into Latin in Montpellier in 1284 under the title Cantica; a version of the translation, revised by Andrea Alpago, was printed in Venice in 1527. (wur)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, O III 63
Paper · 54 ff. · 15.5-16 x 10-11 cm (ff. 21-24: 12.5 x 10.5 cm) · 1621
Remigius Faesch: Iter Italicum

During the Middle Ages, travel to Italy, the so-called “Itinera Italica“, was undertaken primarily for religious reasons (pilgrimages) or for professional purposes (business or commercial travel). But after the Reformation, travel for the sake of education became more common, in Basel as well; its main purpose was an interest in Italy itself and its sights. With this, there came to be travelogues like this one from 1621 by the jurist and rector of the University of Basel, Remigius Faesch (1595-1667). (flr)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 120.I
Parchment · 93 ff. · 34.5 x 21 cm · ca. 1039 – ca. 1056
Composite manuscript: Ado Viennensis: Chronicon; Aurelius Victor (Pseudo-): Epitome de Caesaribus; Abbo Floriacensis: De gestis Romanorum pontificum, lat.

This composite manuscript contains various texts in chronicle form, some of them rare, regarding worldly and ecclesiastical rulers. It is a heavily edited and corrected manuscript from the Benedictine Abbey of Saint-Mesmin de Micy, which contains characteristic writings in various black and brown inks and which is richly decorated with many calligraphic initials in different styles. Based on various supplements, the time of its writing can be dated quite exactly to the middle of the 11th century. (mit)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 120.II
Parchment · 55 ff. · 34.5 x 21 cm · ca. 1195 – ca. 1197
Petrus de Ebulo: Liber ad honorem Augusti, lat.

The so-called Liber ad honorem Augusti by Peter of Eboli is one of the most famous and most requested manuscripts in the Burgerbibliothek Bern. The manuscript is exceptionally richly illustrated; it is from a workshop in the circle of the imperial court in southern Italy. Neither the scribe nor the illustrator is known, but, the text was doubtlessly corrected by the author himself. The text, an epic poem in Latin in about 1700 distichs that has survived only in this manuscript, is divided into three books. The first two books describe the prehistory of Sicily and its conquest by the Staufers; the third book contains a poem in praise of the parents — Emperor Henry VI and his wife Constance, daughter and heir of King Roger II of Sicily — of the famous Hohenstaufen Emperor Frederick II, who was born on 26 December 1194 in Jesi near Ancona. (mit)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 756.66
Parchment · 3 ff. · 17.5 x 26.5; 19 x 38; 17 x 14.5 cm · 1538-1569
Manuscript waste from Cod. 120

These three documents are from the previous binding of Cod. 120 (now 120-1 and 120-2), from which they were removed during restoration. They are two documents from the imperial court of the tribunal of the Counts of Sulz in Rottweil (no. 1 and 3) and a fragment of a bill of sale issued in Strasbourg. (mit)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Chur, Staatsarchiv Graubünden, A 295
Paper · 46 ff. · 20 x 15.5 cm · 1561
[Las dysch æteds]

This manuscript contains the translation into Puter (the dialect of the Upper Engadine) of the drama “Die zehn Alter dieser Welt.“ As of now, it is the oldest known manuscript of a Romansh drama. At the end, it contains a translation of song number 85 by Durich Chiampel[l]; although the original was not published until 1562, the song is written here after the date at the end of the piece (43r-46r). At the end of the manuscript, barely legible, there is a Decalogue (46v). The scribe signed as bartolomeus ulderici zauarit (42v). (dec)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Chur, Staatsarchiv Graubünden, A/N 308
Paper · 8 pp. · 33 x 22 cm · 1544 (?)
La chiarta d la Lyga in Rumauntz

This manuscript contains the translation into Puter (the dialect of the Upper Engadine) of the Federal Charter of 11 November 1544 (German, StAGR A I/01 Nr. 109), written by Fadry Salis (very probably Friedrich von Salis-Samedan, 1512-1570). It was probably written shortly after the original, and thus it is the oldest Romansh document preserved in the original. The alliance of 1544 is a renewal of the alliance between the Grey League, the League of the Ten Jurisdictions and the League of God's House of 23 September 1524, which is generally considered the founding act of the Free State of the Three Leagues. The dating of the manuscript is uncertain since the date 11 November 1544 refers to the German document, which, however, does not bear the signature of Friedrich von Salis. According to the note of confirmation of 8 February 1605, the manuscript must at least have been written prior to this date. (dec)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 15
Paper · III + 117 + II ff. · 29.5 x 21.5 cm · last third of the 15th century
Jean Bagnyon, Fierabras in prose

This paper manuscript contains the prose version of the heroic epic Fierabras by Jean Bagnyon (1412-1497). As a lawyer in Lausanne, he wrote this adaptation around 1465-1470 at the request of Henri Bolomier, Canon of that same city (f. 117v). Divided into three books, the work begins with an outline of the history of the kings of France up to Charlemagne (Book I: f. 7v-19r), followed by the history of the “merveilleux et terrible“ giant Fierabras (Book II: f. 19v-93v), and a story about the Spanish War according to Turpin (Book III: f. 94r-117v). This copy and the Bibliothèque de Genève’s copy (Ms. fr. 188) are the only two handwritten witnesses of this text, which experienced great success in print from the 15th century onward (1st printed edition by Adam Steinschaber in Geneva in 1478). (rou)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 114
Parchment · 229 ff. · 21.9 x 14.5 cm · Northern Italy (Padua - Venice?) · middle of the 15th century
Martialis, Epigrammata

This manuscript, written in a humanistic script, contains the Epigrammata by Martial (ca. 40- ca. 102) in twelve books, followed by the usual two concluding texts, Xenia and Apophoreta. The first leaf of the manuscript is missing. Several epigrams were added, probably at the same time period, but by a hand different from that of the principal scribe (41v, 105v, 132r, 133v, 136v). In the absence of a title page, the decoration is limited to a series of initials, created by two different artists; one with bianchi girari, the other with interlace on a background of gold, sometimes referred to as “a cappio annodato.“ Each epigram begins with a simple initial in blue. Produced in Northern Italy in the middle of the 15th century, the manuscript was verifiably in France since the 18th century, in the hands of the Jarente de Sénas family; later it was owned by Ambroise Firmin-Didot. During the 19th century, ownership changed several times before the manuscript became part of the collection of Martin Bodmer. (rou)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 701
Paper · XI + 200 + IX ff. · 34.8 x 28 cm · Punjab (North-Western India) · 18th century
Bhāgavatapurāṇa, book 10

This is a Panjabi adaptation of the 10th book of the Bhāgavatapurāṇa, in Punjabi/Braj language, in Gurmukhī script. It is a collection of stories of the life of the god Kṛṣṇa, written in verse (caupaī, kabitā, soraṭhā and others). Contrary to the Sanskrit version, the text has no clear chapter structures and has a continuous numeration (880 verses). It is richly illustrated with scenes from the life of the god Kṛṣṇa (more than 200 miniatures), and it is a free verse rendering of the ancient Sanskrit text that was written in ślokas (shlokas), which was extremely popular in India. (ser)

Online Since: 03/22/2018

Documents: 53, displayed: 1 - 20