Documents: 49, displayed: 1 - 20

Sub-project: Call for Collaboration 2015

June 2015 - March 2017

Status: Completed

Financed by: swissuniversities

Description: In the beginning of 2015, e-codices published its third ‘Call for Collaboration.’ This call, published jointly by e-codices and our partner libraries, again attracted a great deal of international interest. After the great response to the first call in June 2009 with 97 applications from 33 scholars, and the overwhelming success of the second call in 2013 with 137 applications from 55 scholars, we have this time received 91 applications from 36 scholars. The scholars again come from a variety of countries: Germany (9), Switzerland (7), United Kingdom (6), the USA (5), Italy (4), France (2), Sweden (1), Armenia (1) and Hungary (1); almost all disciplines of medieval studies are represented. Proposals were for manuscripts from 18 libraries, an especially large number from the Burgerbibliothek Bern (23), the Zentralbibliothek Zürich (12), the Universitätsbibliothek Basel (8), but also from three new collections that have not yet been represented on e-codices. Also suggested were six manuscripts from the Abbey Library of St. Gall, where more than half of the collection of medieval manuscripts has already been made digitally accessible. Such continuing demand clearly shows that, despite the great number of manuscripts that have already been digitized, the scholarly interest has by far not been satisfied. By March 2017, 43 manuscripts from 13 different collections have been published.

All Libraries and Collections

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, A III 26
Paper · 288 ff. · 29 x 21 cm · Basel · Middle of the 15th century
Nicholas of Lyra, Interpretation of the Psalter, Part 1 (Ps. 1-74)

German translation of the postil on the Psalms by Nicholas of Lyra (deceased 1349), probably created during his lifetime. The commentary on the Psalms, earlier attributed to Heinrich von Mügeln, is the work of an anonymous writer, not yet historically ascertained, the so-called “Österreichischer Bibelübersetzer“ (Austrian translator of the Bible). In his translation of the original, he abbreviates the text and supplies additions. This copy from the library of the Carthusian monastery of Basel dates to the middle of the 15th century; the miniatures are part of the Vullenhoe group. (flr)

Online Since: 12/20/2016

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, AN IV 6
Paper · 151 ff. · 21.5 x 16 cm · Augsburg(?) · 7 September 1485
Psalter, German

A German Psalter, written in 1485 by Johannes Waltpurger, perhaps in Augsburg. The ornamental page decorated with vine scroll with the beginning of the first prologue is almost identical to one in a Cambridge manuscript by the same scribe. The back pastedown, glued to the cover, depicts a landscape showered in blood. It is not clear how this manuscript came to Basel. (gam/flr)

Online Since: 06/25/2015

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, B IV 4
Parchment · 192 ff. · 34 x 25 cm · 14th century
Quodlibeta et Quaestiones disputatae

This manuscript from the Dominican Monastery of Basel contains Quodlibeta and Quaestiones by Nicholas Trivet and Thomas Sutton, two important exponents of the Dominican School of Oxford at the end of the 13th century and the beginning of the 14th century. The thin parchment has numerous small defects as well as mended tears in some places; the sixth quire is bound incorrectly. The interior wooden boards of this formerly chained book (liber catenatus) are covered with fragments. (flr)

Online Since: 12/20/2016

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, N I 1:3c
Parchment · 8 ff. · 16 x 13-13.5 cm · Fulda · first quarter of the 9th century
Theodori and Theodulfus Aurelianensis ・ Ordo ad paenitentiam dandam ・ Ps. Augustinus ・ Hrabanus Maurus ・ Ambrosius Autpertus ・ Praecepta vivendi et al.

This fascicle contains the version of the Paenitentiale Theodori named for this textual witness the ‘Canones Basilienses;’ it was written by two hands from Fulda in an Anglo-Saxon minuscule of the first quarter of the 9th century. Around 1500, this quire was part of the current manuscript F III 15e‬‬‬‬. This explains the title de conflictu viciorum et virtutum on 1r, which does not fit with the content of the quire. As evidenced by the lost text at the beginning and at the end, N I 1: 3c had previously been part of another codex. (stb)

Online Since: 03/17/2016

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 125
Parchment · 287 ff. · 32.5 x 23.5 cm · first half of the 15th century
Marco Polo: Devisement du monde; Jean de Mandeville: Voyages; Jean le Long d'Ypres: Récits de voyages

Composite manuscript consisting of three parts, bringing together French translations of classic reports of voyages to the Far East. The manuscript, especially its first and third parts, is richly adorned with gold decoration and delicate scroll ornamentation in the margins, yet it contains no illustrations. Hand-painted coats of arms make it possible to identify the family de Pons de Saint-Maurice from the Périgord as a previous owner; later the codex was purchased by Jacques Bongars, who, towards the end of his life, was preparing a volume of source materials about travels to Asia. (mit)

Online Since: 10/13/2016

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 165
Parchment · 219 ff. · 32.5 x 24.5 cm · France: Tours, Abbey of Saint-Martin OSB · second quarter of the 9th century
Vergilius: Bucolica, Georgica, Aeneis / Scholia Turonensia

This magnificent complete edition of the works of Virgil (Bucolics, Georgics, Aeneid) was given to the Benedictine Monastery of St. Martin in Tours by the Levite Berno (note and book curse on f. 1v). Virgil’s text is interspersed with numerous commentaries (scholia) from late antiquity by Servius and Donatus, which have been transmitted in this form almost exclusively in manuscripts from the Bongarsiana collection. However, Cod. 165 does not present the true Scholia Bernensia as in Cod. 167 und Cod. 172, but rather a collection by various scholiasts which was compiled in Tours — hence the name Scholia Turonensia. (mit)

Online Since: 12/17/2015

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 167
Parchment · 214 ff. · 32 x 23-23.5 cm · France: Auxerre or Brittany · second half of the 9th century
Vergilius: Bucolica, Georgica, Aeneis / Scholia Bernensia

This complete edition of the works of Virgil (Bucolics, Georgics, Aeneid) is connected to Auxerre. In the beginning the manuscript contains numerous paratexts to Virgil, such as the vitae, Argumenta, etc.; beginning on f. 6v, the inner column is reserved for the text, the outer one for the scholia. Virgil’s text is interspersed with numerous commentaries (scholia) from late antiquity by Servius and Donatus, which in this form have been transmitted almost exclusively in manuscripts from the Bongarsiana collection. Cod. 167 presents the true Scholia Bernensia, but only the left column, not the right column of Cod. 172; whether it was copied from the latter remains in dispute. (mit)

Online Since: 12/17/2015

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 172
Parchment · 151 ff. · 31-31.5 x 27.5-28 cm · France: Fleury. vicinity of Paris (Saint-Denis?) (Bischoff) · second quarter of the 9th century
Vergilius: Bucolica, Georgica, Aeneis / Scholia Bernensia

This complete edition of the works of Virgil is from Fleury. This manuscript contains only the Bucolics, the Georgics and the first five books of the Aeneid; the second part with books VI to XII is now in Paris (Bibliothèque Nationale, lat. 7929). In the beginning the manuscript contains the so-called Vita Donatiana and various slightly later texts. It is made with great calligraphic care so that the central column is always bordered on the right and on the left by a column of scholia. Cod. 172 is the principal textual witness of the scholia (commentaries) by Servius and Donatus, which have been transmitted in this form almost exclusively in manuscripts from the Bongarsiana collection. (mit)

Online Since: 12/17/2015

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 258
Parchment · 192 ff. · 27.5 x 19.5-20 cm · France · second half of the 9th century
Glossae biblicae; Glossaria latina, lat.

This manuscript, which was probably produced in Fleury, consists of two independent parts. The first part (f. 1-47) comprises three commentaries on the Old and the New Testament; the second part (f. 48-192) consists of a total of 14 glossaries containing a total of about 25,000 lemmas. A particularity of this manuscript is that it shows different stages in the development of glossaries side by side. The first part represents an earlier stage with definitions of words in the order of the source text, also containing glosses in Old English and Old High German. In the second part the glossaries are already more developed with entries on individual authors or certain topics, ordered alphabetically by keywords. (mit)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 366
Parchment · II + 159 ff. · 22.5-23.5 x 20.5-21 cm · second third of the 9th century
Valerius Maximus: Facta et dicta memorabilia

One of the earliest and most famous manuscripts of Valerius Maximus; its importance lies in the autograph reworkings by Lupus of Ferrières. Lupus himself wrote the Exempla and the comment on the sometime "flyleaves" (f. II-III), repeatedly collated the main text, added supplements from the parallel transmission of Iulius Paris (an abbreviator of Valerius Maximus) and also its accompanying text (Gaius Titius Probus: De praenominibus; f. 158va-159r). In making the fresh description a hitherto unnoticed letter- or charter-like text was discovered on the last page (f. 159v). (all/mit)

Online Since: 06/23/2016

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 611
Parchment · 153 ff. · 18-19 x 14-14.5 cm · France: evidently Eastern France · 8th century (Palimpsests 5th and 7th century)
Composite manuscript: Merovingian excerpts from grammatical, patristic, computistic and medical works

This Merovingian composite manuscript, which was probably created in (Eastern) France, originally consisted of six independent parts, which were written by different, often not very practiced hands in various phases. Most of the close to thirty individual pieces are texts from grammatical, patristic, computistic and medical works. The longer pieces are interspersed with further excerpts, partly written in Tironian notes. One quaternio from the only partially preserved third part is today held in Paris (BN lat. 10756). Noteworthy is the palimpsest in the fifth part, whose undertexts were probably written in Italy in the 7th century and in the second half of the 5th century respectively. (mit)

Online Since: 03/17/2016

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Bern, Burgerbibliothek, Cod. 847.9
Parchment · 2 ff. · 21 x 23.5 cm · 1571
Notarial document (fragment)

These two fragments are from the binding of Cod. 611, from which they were removed during restoration; they are two halves of a French notarial document relating to Pierre Daniel. (mit)

Online Since: 03/17/2016

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 36
Paper · I + 107 + I ff. · 29.1 x 21 cm · Rheinfranken (Rhenish Franconia) · first quarter of the 15th century
Early Modern High German Psalter with Cantica

Written in two columns in bastarda script with a decoration of fleuronné initials, from the first quarter of the 15th century (Wetzel), with two astrological tables added already in the 15th century (Wetzel) on the old flyleaf (f. 1r). The text of the Psalter, in the dialect of Rhenish Franconia (Hessen?), is closely related to the Psalter Göttingen, Niedersächsische Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek, Cod. Ms. theol. 214 v from the beginning of the 15th century. Wetzel assumes at least one common model. Thus the translation is part of Schöndorf’s group 9, subgroup c) around München, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Cgm 182 or Walter’s Psalter 18. (kun)

Online Since: 12/17/2015

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 107
Parchment · 143 ff. · 24 x 17.5 cm · Nordwestern Germany · end of the 9th century
Codex Theodosianum (excerpts) . Lex salica emandata . Lex Ribuaria . Lex Alamannorum . Lex Baiuvariorum . Charlemagne: Capitularia . Recapitulatio legis Salicae

A legal manuscript, probably incomplete, which contains an extensive collection of texts. Among the most important are four laws, the Lex Salica, Lex Ribuaria, Lex Alamannorum and Lex Baiuvariorum; a short and fragmentary collection of capitularies issued by Charlemagne; excerpts from De legibus, from Isidore of Seville’s Sententiae, from the Codex Theodosianum and from the Rule of Saint Benedict. The text of the Lex Baiuvariorum also contains legal terms in Old High German. In 1789 the codex was acquired by Count Johann-Christian Solms, who resided in Klitschdorf Castle near Bunzlau (Silesia) - his coat of arms can be found on f. 1r - which is why the codex is known in the literature as the "Codex Klitschdorf" or "Codex Solmsianus.” In 1960 Martin Bodmer purchased this codex from the New York antiquarian book dealer H. P. Kraus. (ber)

Online Since: 06/25/2015

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Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 79(522)
Parchment · 109 pp. · 24.5 x 19 cm · Einsiedeln · 10th century
Musica enchiriadis

This codex can be dated to the 10th century; it contains the Musica enchiriadis (2-27), a 9th century music theory treatise which endeavors to develop a series of rules for polyphonic composition, as well as annotations to the commentary Scolica enchiriadis (27-45, 66-102). Dasian notation is used in order to graphically illustrate the music. For a long time, this treatise was attributed to the monk Hucbald, but today it is considered the work of an anonymous author. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 117(497)
Parchment · 126 pp. · 25 x 18.5 cm · Einsiedeln · End of the 11th century
Martyrologium, Regula S. Benedicti, Homiliarium

This manuscript contains a martyrology (pp. 1-28), the Rule of Saint Benedict (pp. 28-83) and a homiliary (pp. 84-126). It was written by two scribes in a late Carolingian minuscule and contains two initials decorated with plant branches drawn in ink. In the 13th century, a document about the confraternity of Einsiedeln Abbey and St. Blaise Abbey in the Black Forest was added to a blank area at the end of the text of the Rule of Saint Benedict (p. 83). (ber)

Online Since: 03/17/2016

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Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 255(460)
Parchment · 252 pp. · 27 x 18.8 cm · Einsiedeln · 10th century (around 960-970)
Johannes Cassianus, Vitae et Collationes

This manuscript contains the third part (Collationes 18-24) of the Vitae et collationes patrum by John Cassian. The text is introduced by a full-page miniature, showing a medallion with Cassian in the middle, in the process of writing his work, surrounded by four abbots on a checkered background: Piamun and Giovanni with a round nimbus, Pinufius and Theonas with a square one. This manuscript was part of a group of codices that were created during the term of Abbot Thietland (961 until about 964). (ber)

Online Since: 03/17/2016

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Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 298(119)
Parchment · 146 pp. · 34 x 26.8 cm · France/Lotharingia · 10th century
Boetii geometria et musica

Boethius is the author of the two treatises preserved in this 10th century manuscript: De geometria (1-22) and De musica (23-145). The two texts are surrounded by numerous sketches and marginal as well as interlinear glosses. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 312(541)
Parchment · 296 ff. · 23.5 x 29.6 cm · Southern Germany/Switzerland · 10th/11th century
Prudentius: Praefatio, Cathemerinon, Apotheosis, Hamartigenia, Psychomachia, Contra Symmachum and Peristephanon

This manuscript contains several works by Prudentius and was written by various scribes. The test is surrounded by mostly interlinear glosses; most of these are in Latin, some are in Alemannic dialect. (ber)

Online Since: 03/22/2017

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Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 362(440)
Parchment · 57 ff. · 28.9 x 23.5 cm · Western Germany · 10th century
Terentius Comoediae, Hymnus

The manuscript is a collection containing fragments of the comedies of Terence, from two lost manuscripts of the 10th century (ff. 3r-26v and ff. 28r-55v, respectively ε and η in editions), plus some fragments from a third manuscript (ff. 56r-57v), including portions of Terence’s Phormio and a hymn to St. Nicholas. The size, legibility and state of preservation vary in different fragments. Some missing leaves from the second manuscript (η) are preserved in the collection of fragments St. Gall, Stiftsbibliothek 1394 (pp. 115-120). (pez)

Online Since: 12/17/2015

Documents: 49, displayed: 1 - 20